Mentors, Startups, and Life

I enjoyed doing this interview (embedded below) with Starto.TV. It’s a bit slow getting started, but after the two minute mark I think it captures a bunch of good stuff, such as:

The one big thing that changed my (business life)
How TechStars got started
My graceful failure and the hard lesson I learned from it
What to do after a failure
The first product I ever sold (Now and Laters candy)
Are entrepreneurs born or made?
How to tell the difference between entrepreneurs and wantrepreneurs.
The marketplace where great ideas are traded.
Whether or not you need a Harvard MBA to win at startups.
The top things people do wrong when approaching mentors.
Why mentors want to help in the first place.
How one technology innovation can create thousands of companies and tens of thousands of jobs very quickly.
What’s really amazing about the paid paid vacation.
The value of unplugging.
The power of giving first.
The most important startup tip ever.
Specific examples of the incredible value add of great mentors.

Here’s the video. I enjoyed this interview, and I hope you do too.

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About David Cohen

Geek. Hacker. Investor. Founder and CEO of TechStars.

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  • http://twitter.com/himegansweeney Megan Sweeney

    I enjoyed listening to this interview too:) Covered lots of topics & was inspiring.

  • Bruce Crosby

    A great interview. I especially enjoyed the discussion regarding the need for appropriate mentors. I know this is an area I have neglected (to my detriment) in my career.

  • http://www.theroadtosiliconvalley.com/ Ernest Semerda

    Kickass interview!! Thank you for sharing.

    “The value of unplugging.” – yes yes and yes. It is amazing how a shower, walk in the park, meditation or even sleeping on a problem has the power to bring ideas and solve problems in a blink. Gladwell mentions some of this in Blink.

    I personally have been inspired by Dr John C. Lilly work in the early 1960s on sensory isolation and the wonders it can do for our mind. Sounds weird but keep reading :-) Being able to tap into the subconcious super computer (our mind) to solve problems. This is basically unplugging from the everyday work and stepping into a world similar to meditation.. but deeper.

    I’ve blogged about it here for those interested in learning more about it and how it can benefit software engineers: http://www.theroadtosiliconvalley.com/local-california/isolation-meditation-sensory-deprivation-tank/